Cecil Fredi

Cecil Fredi

Tuesday, 01 July 2008 00:00

No More Wilderness!!!

Reprinted from The Nevada Rancher, May 2008

 

Currently, there are many states that are getting proposed federal land cancer, also known as wilderness. I fought against wilderness in our state (Nevada) to no avail twenty years ago. Basically, wilderness is a cancer afflicting people who want to use federal lands for multiple use.

 

Let’s look at wilderness with a completely wide open mind. Just what the hell is it and just what good or bad does it do? Before we get into breaking it down, let’s define wilderness. The Federal Wilderness Act defines wilderness as an area of 5,000 acres or more of uninterrupted and non-manipulated environment. There are four federal agencies that can restrict land use. They are The Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service and the United States Fish & Wildlife Service.

 

Someone has to start telling the truth about predator control in Nevada. I guess that someone will have to be HUNTER’S ALERT. NDOW does not want to do any predator control. Let me repeat, unequivocally, without a doubt, NDOW refuses to do predator control without being forced into it.

 

In the 2001 legislative session, HUNTER’S ALERT and Nevada Hunters Association with the help of Assemblyman Jerry Claborn were responsible for the passage of A.B. 291 which gives NDOW $341,000 to $400,000 per year for predator control. By the way, no one from NDOW was there to support the predator bill. This alone should let you know how NDOW felt from the very beginning about predator control.

My name is Cecil Fredi. I am representing HUNTER'S ALERT. At the January Wildlife Commission meeting in Henderson, Chairman Brown stated that he wanted more input on the lion issue. He also made the same statement at the February meeting in Reno. HUNTER'S ALERT in conjunction with Safari Club International Desert Chapter decided to give the chairman the input that he was seeking^ I will address this input later on but I would like to make a few points first.

Thursday, 28 October 2004 02:07

Are Cougars Deerslayers?

If cougars do reclaim the Eastern U.S., will they eat all the deer? The commonly accepted answer is that cougars kill one deer per week on average. The calculation dates from a 1959 study. More recent studies have validated this estimate, but they have also shown that there are many variables. For example, cougars have to kill more often in warmer climates, where meat spoils, says David Stoner, graduate research assistant with the Department of Forestry, Range, and Wildlife of Utah State University, who currently has a small population of wild cougars collared with GPS tracking devices. Recently in Yellowstone National Park, where the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reintroduced wolves to the ecosystem, cougars have had to kill more often because the wolves are stealing the cougars’ kills, according to Stoner. But cougars don’t eat only deer. They are opportunists. Studies have found that they’ll eat everything--including porcupines or your dog.

In the 2005 legislative session, HUNTER’S ALERT and Nevada Hunters Association sponsored a bill to audit a very small part of Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW). The bill passed with the help of Assemblyman Jerry Claborn. Jerry realized how badly NDOW was being mismanaged for many years. Getting the bill passed was not easy as NDOW had their favorite puppet, Larry Johnson there testifying against the bill. Larry’s feeble excuse was that NDOW couldn’t afford the audit. As usual, Larry didn’t know what he was talking about as there was no additional cost to perform this audit. Larry failed to realize that if you don’t stand up for what is right, you are wrong.
My name is Cecil Fredi and I have lived in Las Vegas for 64 years. For many of those years, I deer hunted and everyone in the hunting group took home a nice big buck. Those days have been gone for years. Nineteen years ago, I helped form a group called HUNTER’S ALERT. Our primary purpose was to inform sportsmen that we have a predator problem and that something needed to be done about it. We have mailed 31 newsletters resulting in over a quarter of a million copies distributed throughout the state as well as other states. Every issue stated we had a predator problem and what other states were doing about their problem. It wasn’t like NDOW and the Wildlife Commission were not made aware of the fact that we had a serious predator problem for many years. 
Monday, 19 June 2006 08:49

Wildlife Damage Control Works

In the 2001 legislative session, Assembly Bill 291 became law. The bill was sponsored by HUNTER’S ALERT and Nevada Hunters Association. Not another so-called sportsmen’s organization was there to support this bill. A.B. 291 enacted a $3.00 fee on all tag applications. This money was to be dedicated exclusively for wildlife damage control (wdc) formerly called predator control. This money has amounted to over $300,000 a year for wildlife damage control. Wdc is something that neither NDOW nor any of the Wildlife commissioners wanted. However, by law, they were in charge of how the money was to be spent.

Monday, 02 January 2006 20:18

“P” is for Predator

“Sage Grouse Blues” (Conservation, Sept/Oct) stated a multitude of reasons for the decline of the sage grouse. However, none of these reasons mentions the sacred “p” word, “p” like in predator.

I am being told that Nevada Department of Wildlife‘s  (NDOW’s) legislative proposals have already been submitted. If this is true, then this board, along with others, have been treated worse than a mushroom. They have kept you in the dark, but failed to throw you their b.s in time for you to do anything about it.. If you choose to oppose any of NDOW’s bill proposals, you will have to do that at the Legislature because the proposals have already been submitted. It appears that the advisory boards were conveniently left out on some of their proposals and for this reason, it is apparent that they didn’t want your opinion because as usual, your opinion doesn’t count.  The Game Bureau was told all of their bill draft proposals would have to be submitted to the Legislative Committee for approval. However, only Law Enforcement proposals weren’t required to be submitted to the Legislative Committee for approval. Law enforcement proposals were sent directly for bill draft regardless of what the Committee decided. Perhaps after you review the Legislative Committee’s proposals, you may want to submit a petition to change the name from the Nevada Department of Wildlife to the Nevada Department of Law Enforcement!

Action Item #3 would prohibit hunting for a 96 hour period after using aircraft to locate wildlife.

This request by NDOW has to be the most overkill idea they have come up with in a long time. The hierarchy of NDOW must have a lot of time on their hands. In Alaska you cannot hunt on the same day that you fly. It is probably safe to say that 95% of the hunters in Alaska must utilize aircraft. What percentage of Nevada hunters utilize aircraft'1 Probably a tenth of one percent. Alaska, which has a hell of a lot more game to protect says no same-day hunting. So Nevada wants no hunting for four days. This is a pure and simple law enforcement mentality. NDOW does not know how or refuses to bring back our big game numbers. All they know is more law enforcement. We already have 140 ways to cite sportsmen and apparently it is not enough law 1enforcement for NDOW. This is like gun Control. We have thousands of gun laws and they want more.

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